Reflections on the Spartacus Book Club

How It Began For a little over 2.5 years I've volunteered at Spartacus Books, a volunteer-run anti-capitalist bookstore in Vancouver, BC on unceded xʷməθkʷəy̓əm, Skwxwú7mesh Úxwumixw, and Tsleil-Waututh territory. Volunteering at Spartacus is about much more than selling books - we strive to be a space for community events, organizing, socializing, and resource sharing. In … Continue reading Reflections on the Spartacus Book Club

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History as Shared by the Survivors

Photograph of male students from Fort Albany Residential School in class overseen by a nun c 1945.

In this article, Krista McCracken contextualizes, describes, and evaluates the work of the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre (SRSC), established in 1979 at Algoma University College in Sault Sainte Marie, Ontario. In line with Mathiesen (2012) and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2008), McCracken emphasizes the importance of Indigenous communities having access to and control over records related to their history and identity in order to heal from traumas inflicted by colonialism.

Can archives be decolonized?

UBC's Xwi7xwa Library is the only Aboriginal branch of a university library in Canada. It is designed to represent an interior Salish pit-house

Discussion around decolonization has been increasingly present in the last decade or so in academic literature. In her influential book, Decolonizing Methodologies (first published in 1999), Linda Tuhiwai Smith articulates the concept of decolonization as, “about centring our concerns and world views and then coming to know and understand theory and research from our own perspectives and for our own purposes”, where “our” represents Indigenous peoples (Smith 2012, 41). This definition has impacted how many scholars comprehend decolonization. However, the term can be defined in many other ways.