NVDPL Booklist: “We Are Story: Indigenous Literature”

One of the fun things I get to do as a Student Librarian at North Vancouver District Public Library is update booklists, which we provide to help patrons find great titles to read and enjoy. Last week I worked on updating our "We Are Story: Indigenous Literature" booklist with new titles, authors' nations, and more... Continue Reading →

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Genre Guide: Indigenous Futurisms

As many people close to me know, my favourite genres are science fiction and fantasy. I have been a big fan of these genres since I was a kid, and continue to enjoy them today. I enjoy their intriguing settings, inspiring characters, and exciting story lines. And, I love how they are extremely well suited... Continue Reading →

Territory Acknowledgement

This post was written for the website native-land.ca, which is run by my friend Victor. Laura Phillips was immensely helpful in editing and providing suggestions on the initial draft. Why acknowledge territory? Territory acknowledgement is a way that people insert an awareness of Indigenous presence and land rights in everyday life. This is often done... Continue Reading →

Reflections on the Spartacus Book Club

How It Began For a little over 2.5 years I've volunteered at Spartacus Books, a volunteer-run anti-capitalist bookstore in Vancouver, BC on unceded xʷməθkʷəy̓əm, Skwxwú7mesh Úxwumixw, and Tsleil-Waututh territory. Volunteering at Spartacus is about much more than selling books - we strive to be a space for community events, organizing, socializing, and resource sharing. In... Continue Reading →

Archival inspiration

In the spirit of celebration of having made it through my first semester of archival studies, I thought I would share some archives that inspire me! This fall, I was disappointed to find that my classes were predominantly dedicated to learning about the history of bureaucracy in western Europe, the archival system of settler colonial... Continue Reading →

History as Shared by the Survivors

In this article, Krista McCracken contextualizes, describes, and evaluates the work of the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre (SRSC), established in 1979 at Algoma University College in Sault Sainte Marie, Ontario. In line with Mathiesen (2012) and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2008), McCracken emphasizes the importance of Indigenous communities having access to and control over records related to their history and identity in order to heal from traumas inflicted by colonialism.

Can archives be decolonized?

Discussion around decolonization has been increasingly present in the last decade or so in academic literature. In her influential book, Decolonizing Methodologies (first published in 1999), Linda Tuhiwai Smith articulates the concept of decolonization as, “about centring our concerns and world views and then coming to know and understand theory and research from our own perspectives and for our own purposes”, where “our” represents Indigenous peoples (Smith 2012, 41). This definition has impacted how many scholars comprehend decolonization. However, the term can be defined in many other ways.

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